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4 Lessons a Lifelong Dieter Learned After Trying Keto

My first foray into the dieting world started in middle school when my parents and I enrolled in the Weight Watchers Smart Points program. (Puberty and overeating were making things a bit tough for this pre-teen trying to figure himself out.)

Back then, my eating habits and my changing body amounted to me getting breast reduction surgery—a clear indication that I needed to change my relationship with food.

The WW program worked well for me, until it didn’t. As soon as my weight loss plateaued, so did my motivation. I went back to care-free eating until my junior year of high school, when a friend suggested I try the Atkins Diet. I wanted to lose weight more rapidly than I had on Weight Watchers years earlier. Atkins kicked off off my 20-plus-years, on-and-off relationship with low-carb.

Doing Atkins in high school was surprisingly easy. A typical day included plates of bacon at breakfast, deli meat straight from the package for lunch, and fast food burgers without the bun (…

Should You Eat Avocados - Or Are They Too High In Fat?

Where did the concept enter the nutrition field that avocados might not be healthy?
A scenario like this happens several times a week in my preventive cardiology clinic: A 43-year old man has his second heart event and adopts a whole food, plant-based diet with no added oils.

He thrives on the control it gives him over future cardiac disease. He knows of Drs. Ornish and Esselstyn.

When he sees me in my office, he turns to me and asks: "Doc, I love all of this and am devoted. But, can I have half of an avocado a few times a week because I read it is off my menu?"
Are avocados healthy? Where did the concept enter the nutrition field, or specifically, the heart disease reversal field, that avocados might not be healthy?

Why do the programs that demonstrate the amazing power of plant-based diets to halt and reverse heart disease generally restrict avocados?
Low fat diets In a prior article I wrote about the pioneers of plant-based cardiac nutrition and highlighted Lest…

5 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Maintain Keto on the Road

The keto diet is hard. It's harder when you're traveling. These products can help.

Disclosure: Our goal is to feature products and services that we think you'll find interesting and useful. If you purchase them, Entrepreneur may get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners.

The keto diet has exploded in popularity recently as it has been shown to deliver great results while it doesn’t ask you to give up too many foods. However, reaching ketosis requires some attention to timing and detail, which can be extremely difficult when you’re on the road for business.
Thrive Market, however, simplifies keto. With a wide selection of keto-friendly food that you can easily pack with you on your travels, Thrive Market eliminates much of the hassle of reaching ketosis. While everyone else at the conference heads to Panera, you can stay on task with a snack from Thrive Market. Check out some of their best options below:
Original Grass-Fed Be…

Is it OK to eat potatoes every day?

A study looked at the effect of eating potatoes every day, compared to eating the same number of calories in refined grains.

Potatoes are the most commonly consumed vegetable in the U.S., yet they often get a bad rap. Most are eaten the form of fries or chips, so many people consider them an unhealthy food.
It doesn’t have to be that way.

Eating one medium-size potato a day can be part of a healthy diet and doesn’t increase cardiometabolic risk — the chances of having diabetes, heart disease or stroke — as long as the potato is steamed or baked, and prepared without adding too much salt or saturated fat, a study by nutritionists at The Pennsylvania State University found.

Consuming non-fried potatoes also led to higher potassium and fiber intake compared to eating refined grains, like white rice, white bread or pasta, they noted. The results were published last month in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Heart Month: Nutritionist tips on foods with our heart in mind

Finding heart healthy foods can be intimidating. Nutritionist Deborah Enos takes some of the guesswork out and breaks down some simple things we can add to our diet with our heart in mind.  

From Nutritionist Deborah Enos: "I lost my dad to heart disease in August of 2016.

Part of my mission as a nutritionist is to show people how easy it can be to prevent this deadly disease.

I want to help people avoid what my dad went through…

1. In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 40 seconds.
2. Every year, about 805,000 Americans have a heart attack.
3. 605,000 are a first heart attack
4. 200,000 happen to people who have already had a heart attack.
5. About 1 in 5 heart attacks is silent—the damage is done, but the person is not aware of it.
6. One person dies every 37 seconds in the United States from cardiovascular disease.
7. About 647,000 Americans die from heart disease each year—that’s 1 in every 4 deaths.
(CDC stats)

It’s not just about cutting out unhealthy hab…

Euronews Living | Is 'intuitive' eating a credible diet, or just a craze?

The anti-diet approach to losing weight is all about trusting your instincts. And that means eating what you want, when you want.

Dieting is so last decade. Nowadays, rules are out and instinct is in, as the health-conscious admit to feeling trapped by restrictive meal plans and struggle to lose weight. Indeed, consumers actually “equate the word diet with deprivation, and they know deprivation doesn't work," says Susan Roberts, professor of nutrition and psychiatry at Tufts University in the U.S.

In the last 10 years, the number of Americans counting calories has gone down, an NPD Group study reports. Shoppers are now more likely to seek items with minimal processing and no artificial ingredients than adopt a diet.

'Intuitive eating' has become a trendy term in the health and fitness space, but is it a credible approach to dieting? In fact, it is the antithesis to dieting, having been dubbed the ‘anti-diet’ by nutritionists.

Intuitive eating was first coin…

Top 10 micro-changes to supercharge long-term weight loss

When it comes to weight loss, we all know it’s the big things like moving more and eating less that will get results. But add these micro-changes to the mix and you’ll be surprised at the results.

As we hurtle towards the end of February, it’s a good time to take stock of those health resolutions we optimistically made at the start of the year.

Chances are, the gym sessions have slacked off as life gets busier and you’re not cooking at home as much as you would like.

Completely changing your lifestyle is a big ask, but luckily science says small changes can also reap big results.

A new study from Cal Poly University, published in the journal Obesity, found that micro-behaviours were a key factor in long-term weight loss.

Researchers surveyed nearly 5,000 WW members (the new Weight Watchers) who had, on average, lost 22kg and kept it off for three or more years and identified 54 micro-behaviours that had an impact on long-term weight loss.

According to Dr Michelle Celander, Dir…

Can you eat an egg a day and still have a healthy heart?

Is it okay to eat eggs? Three large studies have some heartening news.

Eating one egg a day does not increase risk for cardiovascular disease or death, a new study has found. 

Is it okay to eat eggs? A new analysis based on three large studies involving nearly 178,000 people found that eating one egg a day did not increase risk for cardiovascular disease or death, even among those with a history of heart disease or diabetes.

The researchers from McMaster University in Canada also reported no significant association between egg consumption and cholesterol levels. For decades, fear of cholesterol problems led many people to cut back on eggs since they are a source of dietary cholesterol. Nutrition experts say the average large egg yolk contains nearly 200 milligrams of cholesterol - about two-thirds of what was considered the daily maximum for dietary cholesterol consumption until 2015, when federal nutritional guidelines stopped recommending a dietary cholesterol limit.

Most cholester…

Kelly Ripa on health: 'It's not just about living longer, it's about living better'

The "Live With Kelly and Ryan" host spoke about her love of nutrition and the changes she's made to her health and wellness routine.

 Kelly Ripa is known to her fans as a health and fitness fanatic.

The "Live With Kelly and Ryan" host is open about her support of the Alkaline Diet, has showed off clips of her workouts on her popular Instagram account and constantly promotes an active lifestyle.

She described where her love of nutrition and wellness stems from during a recent interview with "Good Morning America."

"Well, you know, it's funny, I have three, now three young adult, children, and I have four aging parents, between my parents and my in laws," she said. "And we as humans are living longer and longer, but it's not just about living longer. It's about living better."

"I just see things that aren't addressed as young people [that] will have to be addressed as older people, and I don't want to live m…

Take the confusion out of food labels

confusing at the supermarket when you read the labels of some of your favorite foods. Some of the buzzwords and health claims make not-so-healthy foods sound healthy – and like something you should buy.

Health expert, Karen Owoc, sorts out what to look for and what to ignore.

“Gluten-free”
Gluten-free is significant to patients with gluten sensitivities, like celiac disease, but many Americans on a mission to lose weight turned to the “gluten-free diet” for weight loss.
There is no evidence that supports this diet for weight loss, and it wasn’t intended to help you lose weight. The word “gluten-free” is not a badge of being good for your health nor is it the key to losing weight.

Gluten-free products are a lot lower in fiber than whole wheat foods. That’s because they’re mostly made with rice flour. Also, individuals that follow a gluten-free diet have lower levels of good gut bacteria, which lowers immunity and elevates risk of chronic diseases.
Those on gluten-free diets also tend …

Weight loss diet plan: The one food you should eat more of to help burn belly fat fast

High-protein sources for vegans: Kidney beans and tofu
When trying to lose weight it can be tempting to drastically cut certain foods your diet plan. While removing unhealthy foods can speed up weight loss, eating more of the right foods can actually give the best results. Having a diet high in protein can speed up weight loss, an expert explained.


It can be tempting to eat less when trying to lose a few pounds but this does not necessarily work.

Tucking into foods high in protein could give the best results, Elliott Upton, personal trainer at Ultimate Performance and Head of LiveUP Online Coaching, said.

He told Express.co.uk: “Every meal should be built around a quality source of protein.

“It helps to repair, rebuild and maintain muscle tissue, which not only improves body composition - the way your body looks - but also increases metabolic rate.”

Weight loss: Eating foods high in protein can help weight loss
 Weight loss: High protein diet plan gym powder
Weight loss: Eating high …

U.S. meat eaters should consider this study before their next grocery run

People who indulge in steak may want to take a break.
Plant-based diets have been popular in the media recently, but research shows that going vegetarian or vegan isn’t only good for the environment, but for our health, too.

Meat-rich diets are linked to a range of health problems, from heart disease and strokes to type two diabetes and some cancers. (People who eat diets high in meat have also been found to live shorter lives.)

A new US study has again shown that adults that eat diets high in animal protein are at increased risk of developing a wide range of chronic diseases. The authors recommend a plant-based protein diet to reduce these risks.

Importantly, the study is the first to investigate what effect diets high in sulfur amino acids have on our health. These are found in many foods but are typically found in high amounts in eggs, fish, red meat and chicken. When consumed at recommended levels, sulfur amino acids play a crucial role in our bodies. They help our metabolism, pr…

The benefits of intermittent fasting

I’ve long thought that the human body was not meant to run on empty, that fasting was done mainly for religious reasons or political protest. Otherwise we needed a reliably renewed source of fuel to function optimally, mentally, emotionally and physically.

Personal experience reinforced that concept; I’m not pleasant to be around when I’m hungry. There’s even an official name for that state of mind, confirmed by research: Hangry!

But prompted by recent enthusiasm for fasting among people concerned about their health, weight or longevity, I looked into the evidence for possible benefits — and risks — of what researchers call intermittent fasting. Popular regimens range from ingesting few if any calories all day every other day or several times a week to fasting for 16 hours or more every day.

A man I know in his early 50s said he had lost 12 pounds (5.4kg) in about two months on what he calls the 7-11 diet: He eats nothing from 7pm until 11am the next day, every day.

I was sceptical, …

Eat then don't: What the 5:2 diet actually does to to your body

The 5:2 diet allows you to eat as usual for five days and to fast for two days.
The “new” weight-loss strategy known as the 5:2 diet has been receiving much attention in the media since the book The Fast Diet: The Secret of Intermittent Fasting - Lose Weight, Stay Healthy, Live Longer was launched late last year.

The 5:2 diet allows you to eat as usual for five days and to fast for two days. On fasting days, the dieters need to restrict intake of food to approximately 2000 kilojoules (500 calories) a day for women or 2400 kilojoules (600 calories) for men.

The two days of fasting don’t have to be consecutive and you can decide how you want to spread your food intake on those days as long as you adhere to energy restriction. The food consumed during the two fasting days should have little fat and carbohydrate content and alcohol consumption is not recommended.

During the two fasting days, you are typically allowed protein foods such as eggs, or low-fat yogurt or cheese for breakfast a…

7 Impressive Ways Vitamin C Benefits Your Body

Here are 7 scientifically proven benefits of taking a vitamin C supplement.

1. May Reduce Your Risk of Chronic Disease Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that can strengthen your body's natural defenses.

Antioxidants are molecules that boost the immune system. They do so by protecting cells from harmful molecules called free radicals.

When free radicals accumulate, they can promote a state known as oxidative stress, which has been linked to many chronic diseases.

Studies show that consuming more vitamin C can increase your blood antioxidant levels by up to 30%. This helps the body's natural defenses fight inflammation.

Summary

Vitamin C is a strong antioxidant that can boost your blood antioxidant levels. This may help reduce the risk of chronic diseases like heart disease.

2. May Help Manage High Blood Pressure Approximately one-third of American adults have high blood pressure.

High blood pressure puts you at risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death globally.

Studi…