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This Surprising Habit Can Stave Off Dementia, Says Study

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated five million adults with dementia —a number expected to reach nearly 14 million by 2060. While there is no cure for the degenerative health condition, there are ways to help improve quality of life. And, according to recent research there is one thing in particular that can positively impact those who are suffering from dementia. Read on to find out more—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had COVID . Listening to Music Can Help Improve Cognitive Functioning According to a recent meta analysis study from Pitt published in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society , listening to music can help improve quality of life and mood, as well as cognitive functioning.  "We are excited to see these results because participating in music, like singing in a choir or playing in a drum circle, is a safe, engaging activity that our research demonstrate

Major Sign You May Have Dementia, Says Study

Dementia is a progressive disease, and it's important to treat it as early as possible so its progression can be slowed. That's challenging, because many early symptoms of dementia are vague—and some may seem unrelated to the condition. A new study suggests there's a major sign that you may develop dementia that may be overlooked. Read on to find out more—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID . 1 What Is Dementia? Dementia is an umbrella term for several disorders of the brain that involve changes to memory, thinking, personality, and judgment. Ultimately, these changes interfere with a person's ability to function and live an independent life.  Most cases of dementia are diagnosed in people older than 65, and the biggest risk factor for dementia is simply getting older. Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting about 6.2 million Americans.  2 A Majo

This One Thing Could Predict Dementia, Says Study

You can't predict if you'll get dementia but there are predictive factors—and researchers believe they have discovered a new one. "People with dementia may experience increased levels of pain 16 years before their diagnosis, according to research," reports the National Institute on Aging. "The study, funded in part by NIA and published in Pain , is the first to examine the link between pain and dementia over an extended period." Read on to see what pain they mean— and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID . 1 Pain is a Correlate or Symptom of Dementia, Study Finds "Dementia and chronic pain both cause changes to the brain and can affect a person's brain health," says the NIA. "Although many people who have dementia also have chronic pain, it is unclear whether chronic pain causes or accelerates the onset of dementia, is a symptom of dementia, or is simpl

One Major Side Effect of Obesity, Says Study

Obesity , the second leading cause of preventable death in the country, impacts over 42 percent of American adults in the United States—and the chronic disease is becoming increasingly prevalent. There are a number of side effects of having a dangerously inflated BMI, including organ system damage leading to different issues such as diabetes, joint disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and being more susceptible to disease and viruses, such as COVID-19 . Now a recent study has identified another major side effect of obesity. Read on to find out what it is and about science-backed steps you can take to prevent obesity. And to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID . 1 Being Obese Can Restrict Blood Flow to Your Brain Scientists at The Irish Longitudinal Study on Aging (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin have found that being overweight or obese can significantly reduce blood flow to the brain, a term called "

Major Sign You May Have Alzheimer's, Says Study

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the U.S, with more than five million people affected. At the same time, it is disproportionately mysterious. Although scientists have become more sure about the causes of Alzheimer's—including a buildup of toxic plaques in the brain called amyloids—much about the disorder is still poorly understood, including how the brain reacts as the disease progresses (and therefore how it might be slowed or stopped).  But a recent study has provided some potential insight on that process. Read on to learn about the study findings and the signs of Alzheimer's disease. And to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had COVID 1 This is How Alzheimer's Progresses Researchers from the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Research Center (NDRC) and MIT/Koch Institute developed a new model of how Alzheimer's progresses. In their research, they found an association bet

Signs You May Get Alzheimer's Early, Says Study

Alzheimer's likely develops as a result of multiple factors—genetics, lifestyle, and environment included—per the Alzheimer's Association . While there is no way to know for sure whether someone will develop Alzheimer's later in life, a recent study claims that there is one health condition which might be a predictor of the memory loss disease occurring earlier rather than later.  Read on to find out more—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID . 1 People With Depression May Get Alzheimer's Disease Early, Says Study While it is already known that depression is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease, the latest research claims that if people do develop Alzheimer's disease, those with depression may start experiencing dementia symptoms about two years earlier than those who do not have depression. Additionally, those suffering from anxiety who go on to develop the cond

This One Thing Could Predict if You'll Get Diabetes, Says Study

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , about ten percent of Americans, or 34 million, suffer from diabetes . 90 to 95 percent of them have type 2 diabetes, meaning your body doesn't use insulin properly. There are multiple risk factors for diabetes, some of them preventable and others not. Researchers are continually studying diabetes, hoping to gain more understanding about what causes it and how to prevent it. Recently new findings have identified a significant risk factor for type 2 diabetes, that could help prevent many people from developing the condition. Read on to find out more about this condition—and to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You May Have Already Had COVID . 1 Your Childhood BMI Could Predict Diabetes The research letter, published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology found that childhood obesity—a high body mass index (BMI)—could be a significant risk factor for type 2 d